Ian Shinton's webpage

As you can probably tell this webpage is quite spartain in appearance, this is because I am quite busy.

Name: Dr Ian Shinton
Position: RA level 6 working for Manchester University and the Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Labratory, UK
Research interests:
Finite element techniques, in conjuction with Maxwell's equations
Plasmas
Plasma accelerators
Ion engines and Pulsed plasma thrusters
Linacs

Current research:

1)Globablised Scattering matrix method for the simulation of large accelerating structures:

There is a need to be able to accurately model the electromagnetic fields in large accelerating structures en masse in which the effects of couplers, trapped modes, Wakefields, realistic machining and alignment errors as well as numerous other important effects have been taken into consideration. The necessity to be able to accurately predict the performance of proposed baseline designs is further enhanced by the expected difficulties that will be present if alterations or cavity tuning is required within. Even with a parallel code meshing and accurately modelling the main linacs of an RF accelerator will require vast resources and time, not only that but the inclusion of realistic defects and misalignments into the baseline configuration will prove time consuming as it will potentially require remeshing of the problem. What is proposed herein is a powerful technique that may be used to attempt to model a the accelerating sections of a large RF acclerating structure, the globalised scattering matrix technique. The globalised scattering matrix technique is a relatively mature RF concept, in which the scattering matrix of a junction is obtained by “cascading” two sections at a time, these individual cascaded sections will henceforth be referred to as “unit cells”. The technique is very efficient and can readily incorporate misalignments and cavity perturbations into the calculation. Once the generalised cascaded matrix has been obtained for each and every cell in the structure in terms of each and every other cell in the structure the electromagnetic field (within an individual cell or a series of cells) can then be determined and trapped modes and other phenomena can be calculated.

2)Collabrate work with SLAC, FERMI Lab, The University of Rostock and DESY on the HOM measurements on the FLASH linac:

A system has been deveolped in which the HOM's from the HOM couplers are being used as a highly accurate BPM system for diagnostic purposes.

3)Development of an open source FEM cavity design code

Presently working on a number of open source FEM codes for the use of RF cavity design which when completed will be freely avaliable to the scientific comunity.

Currently involved in the deveolpment of a basic 2D cavity design code writen in Octave in which HOM and cavity optimisation of such structures akin to the TESLA, Xband and Click accelerating structures may be simulated.
Also involved in the develpoment of a large scale FEM RF design tool with the help of C.Glasman which is written using a highly parallel multiphysics FEM code OomphLib (developed by Dr Matthias Heil and Dr Andrew Hazel, School of Mathematics, Manchester University). With the use of Oomphlib large scale simulations of RF accelerating cavities with the inclusion of multiphysical effects (such as heat transfer and multipacting) will be possible.

Recent papers and workshops

GLOBAL SCATTERING MATRIX TECHNIQUE APPLIED TO THE CALCULATION OF HIGHER ORDER MODES FOR ILC SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITIES
I. Shinton and R.M. Jones; Cockcroft institute, Daresbury; and The University of Manchester, UK
Proceedings for PAC 07, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 25-29 Jun 2007

SCATTERING MATRIX CALCULATION OF HIGHER ORDER MODES AND SENSITIVITY TO CAVITY FABRICATION ERRORS FOR THE ILC SUPERCONDUCTIVE CAVITIES
I. Shinton and R.M. Jones; Cockcroft institute, Daresbury; and The University of Manchester, UK
Proceedings for SRF 2007, Beijing, China, 15-19 Oct 2007

SIMULATION OF TRANSVERSE HIGHER ORDER DEFLECTING MODES IN THE MAIN LINACS OF THE ILC
C. J. Glasman, R. M. Jones, I. Shinton - University of Manchester, Cockcroft Institute; G. Burt - University of Lancaster, Cockcroft Institute
Proceedings for SRF 2007, Beijing, China, 15-19 Oct 2007

GLOBALISED SCATTERING MATRIX SIMULATIONS IN ILC CAVITIES AND MODULES
"Wake Fest 07 - ILC wakefield workshop at SLAC"



Education and Qualifications

2001-20005: Massey University, New Zealand
PhD awarded
Thesis: “Development of a Plasma Gun for application in Magnetized Target Fusion”.
The purpose of this research was to develop a pulsed coaxial (Marshall) plasma accelerator for application to a recently proposed Magnetized Target Fusion scheme (MTF). The research conducted involved both an experimental investigation and the development of a preliminary 2D axisymmetrical numerical model.
The outcome of this Thesis was a unique pulsed plasma accelerator that used a piezoelectric valve to linearly inject short, neutral hydrogen gas pulses into the plasma accelerator. The neutral gas hydrogen gas pulses introduced into the accelerator had FWHH pulse widths of 30us, longitudinal temperatures below 13K, and an approximate mass of 200ng per pulse. Preionization of the neutral gas pulse within the accelerator resulted in a series of plasma sheaths being accelerated in the regions of 40km/s, 50km/s and 60-80km/s.The bulk of the plasma generated in this device appears to be travelling in the region of 40-50km/s with a longitudinal temperature between 3000K and 5000K. The 2D axisymmetrical electromagnetic model, used to simulate the operation of the bulk of the accelerated plasma, was based upon standard techniques found in the literature and used cubic finite elements set in a moving reference frame. Even though the prototype plasma accelerator developed in this Thesis did not meet the mass requirements of the proposed MTF scheme, both the prototype plasma accelerator and valve were shown to be viable options that may, with future development, be of interest to the MTF scheme.

1997-2000: University of Auckland, New Zealand
BTech of Materials with first class honours awarded (Conjoint BSc/Eng with honours equivalent)
“A” average student (based upon average derived from results of years 3 and 4 of the degree).
The BTech of Materials was a degree that was formally offered by the University of Auckland. It was essentially a conjoint degree between the Physical Chemistry and Chemical Engineering disciplines, with the emphasis of the degree being the structure and nature of materials.
Final year project: “An analytical approach to the bonding mechanism of HVOF, HVAF and Plasma sprayed coatings”. The dissertation was concerned with developing an analytical model to describe HVOF, HVAF and Plasma sprayed coatings.